SURVEY QUESTION TYPES


ADVANCED QUESTION TYPES



 Reorder - ranking question type

Reorder is a more advanced question type because of the effort it takes for respondents to answer it and for researchers to interpret the data. It allows you to compare different items between each other by asking respondents to read the entire list and rank order the entities by dragging them up or down. You can add 2 to 7 items, and while AYTM Prime members can go up to 10, it's important to remember that it's quite difficult for the human brain to keep in mind more than 7 items at the same time and compare them all between each other. Multiple studies show we are much better at determining the best and the worst items from a list, while we exert less effort identifying the shades of grey in between. If you plan to compare more than 5 items, we strongly recommend considering upgrading to such research tests as Side-by-side Comparison or Max Diff.



The order in which compared items appear for each respondent can be randomized if global randomization is on in the survey. Each specific item can be anchored to its position to make an exception from the global randomization rule, but due to the nature of this question it's usually not recommended to use the anchoring option.


The main question and each item can have a unique image associated with it. Each image can be expanded to the full width of the survey widget, or appear as a thumbnail and pop up on mouse rollover as a reference. Please be extra careful with expanding illustrations for this question type. It may be cumbersome, especially on mobile devices, to drag and drop large items with expanded images due to screen size limitations.


Each field has a limited number of characters: 120 for questions, 90 for answers. AYTM Prime members can use up to 240 characters for the question field.


The ranking question can have a specific skip logic destination (use the rabbit icon to set up). Conditional logic is available upon request. It allows you to determine such conditions as "If item A is placed in position 1 or 2, then…."



IN THE SURVEY EDITOR



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET



ON THE STATS PAGE


 Side-by-side comparison - Adoptive Comparison Research Test

This test is the best way to show images or short words side by side, asking respondents to choose one of the two at a time. If you only have two large images, such as package design, webpage layout, or a print ad, and it's critical to display them simultaneously in full screen, just upload your graphics for each answer choice and select the full screen option.



If you have many logos/icons/banners/short names/etc. to compare, this is where you can take full advantage of the side-by-side experiment. The system will break your items into balanced pairs and present two at a time to respondents, asking them to choose one. We've implemented a smart adaptive algorithm that will show the minimum number of pairs to each respondent in order to arrive at a clear conclusion of their preferences. For example, if we know that A was better than B and B was better than C, we can conclude that A was better than C without asking it explicitly. Since we only show two items at a time, it's extremely easy for respondents to compare and choose, but the chain of pairs may produce a rather long experiment, so we have to deduct a proportional number of questions from the rest of the survey.


You can test 2 to 10 items in a single test, which will take 1-5 questions from your survey. Question text will be repeated for each pair. The side-by-side comparison test appears as a single question in the survey editor. Unlike the MaxDiff test, it will still be presented as a single question for respondents. We'll add an internal progress bar below the pair to give respondents a sense of their progress. Depending on the number of compared items, this test can be very time consuming, so we'll reserve 1-5 questions from the overall survey length. Please pay attention to the note at the bottom of the question, "Experiment is using XQs," to keep an eye on the length of the survey. You may have to remove additional questions in the survey in order to run an even larger side-by-side comparison test.


The order in which compared items are presented in each quad for each respondent cannot be anchored, since it's governed by our special adaptive algorithm.


The main question and each compared item can have an image associated with it. For a more balanced comparison, we recommend using images for all compared items, or not use them at all for any items. You can add an image thumbnail to the question field, but it will not be visible in full screen mode.


Each field has a limited number of characters: 120 for questions, 90 for tested items. AYTM Prime members can use up to 240 characters for the question field.


The side-by-side comparison test can have a single skip logic destination, please use the rabbit icon to set it up.


Special settings for this question include:

  • Full screen. Select this checkbox if you want to present your graphics as large as possible. The pairs will be expanded to the maximum width allowed by the respondent's screen. If you are using images, make sure to upload your highest resolution files possible; we'll downsample them if necessary.


IN THE SURVEY EDITOR



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET




ON THE STATS PAGE


 Distribute - advance numeric sliders

The Distribute question type is used to ask respondents to allocate numeric values among 2 to 7 items and collect high-resolution numeric responses. Use it if you need respondents to indicate how much value they see in each of the listed qualities, or how would they distribute a budget among listed items. Like the Price Sensitivity Meter (van Westendorp), this question type prompts you to enter the total amount in the format that’s relevant to your study. For example, you can enter $100, £36, €50 etc., or $10/month, 5 tons/year, etc. We will mimic your format for each subquestion and use it as the upper limit on each slider. Next to the sum/units field you will find a combobox allowing you to set up the increment and number of stops on the sliders. By default we’ll set it to the smallest increment and largest number of stops, to offer the maximum possible data resolution level. You can adjust it to other increments according to your preference and common expectations for the currency/units you are using. The maximum number of steps on the slider is 100.



Special settings for this question include:

  • Constant sum. Use this option if you want respondents to distribute a fixed budget (constant sum) among the listed items. Each time the respondent moves a slider, it’ll deduct a corresponding amount from the overall budget, and won’t allow the respondent to advance to the next question until the entire budget is allocated.
  • Continuous sum. Use this option if you want to set the maximum limit for each item, but you’re not concerned about the overall sum, which will fluctuate. Respondents will be able to position each item anywhere in the range from 0 to the upper limit (equal to the sum you specify). This mode also allows you to show the sum to respondents or hide it. It is useful to keep respondents appraised of the total amount that they’ve used among all items, such as when you collect feedback on the cost of an event or project.

The main question and each item can have a unique image associated with it. Each image can be expanded to the full width of the survey widget, or appear as a thumbnail and pop up on mouse rollover as a reference.


The question field has a limited number of characters: 120 for the question, 90 for subquestions. AYTM Prime members can use up to 240 characters for the question field.


The order in which items appear for each respondent can be randomized if global randomization is ON in the survey. Each specific item can be anchored to its position to make an exception from the global randomization rule.


The Distribute question can have a single skip logic destination, please use the rabbit icon to set it up.



CONSTANT SUM IN THE SURVEY EDITOR



CONTINUOUS SUM IN THE SURVEY EDITOR



CONSTANT SUM IN THE SURVEY WIDGET



CONTINUOUS SUM IN THE SURVEY WIDGET



CONSTANT SUM ON THE STATS PAGE



CONTINUOUS SUM ON THE STATS PAGE



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET



ON THE STATS PAGE

See an example of results on a stats page
This question type doesn't work with the AYTM Personality Radar

 Combobox - Long list with single choice

Combobox is useful when you want to offer respondents a long list of items from which they choose an answer. It allows you to pack hundreds or even thousands of items into a very compact survey element. By the nature of this UI element, it's not designed or optimized for reading through a long list of unfamiliar terms, but it's very useful for alphabetically or numerically organized lists of items with which most respondents are already familiar (such as lists of countries, names, languages, states, colors, popular names etc.). These and similar prewritten libraries can be found in the combobox under the note "Select a data set below or create a custom one:".



You can create/edit your own list:
You can create or edit your custom list of answer choices right on this page (in a pop up window). Use the Enter key to create new answer choices. Click Apply to save.


If you have a list ready outside of the AYTM platform, you can copy/paste your list into the combobox editor (up to 10,000 records) or upload a list file.


Uploading a list file:
You can upload a list of answer choices for the combobox in plain text (*.txt) format, preferably in Unicode with each answer on its own line. Use underscore _ before the first line that you want to use as a default text (e.g.: _Please select). Add (...) at the end of a line to allow an optional open-ended answer.


The order in which answer choices appear in the list for each respondent cannot be randomized, even if global randomization is ON in the survey.


The question can have an image associated with it which can be expanded to the full width of the survey widget, or it can appear as a thumbnail and pop up on mouse rollover as a reference.


Each answer choice can have an optional open-ended box attached. This will allow respondents to provide text answers if the selected answer is "Other, please specify…."


Each field has a limited number of characters: 120 for questions, 40 for answers. AYTM Prime members can use up to 240 characters for the question field.


Combobox question can have a single skip logic destination, which can be set up using the rabbit icon.



IN THE SURVEY EDITOR



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET



ON THE STATS PAGE

See an example of results on a stats page
This question type doesn't work with the AYTM Personality Radar

 Cascade - Nested comboboxes

Cascade is an advanced question type that allows you to put an entire database into your survey, keeping answers organized while providing a very straightforward experience for survey takers. You may have experienced this tool when filling out a form that opened new fields based on your prior selections; for example, when you shop for a car or auto insurance, sites often prompt you to select the make, model, year, and trim of the vehicle. Each time you make a selection, you limit the content only to the relevant items of the next nested combobox. We brought this technology to the AYTM survey platform and offer you access to vast databases: "Country/state-province/county/zip," "Vehicle make/model/year/trim," and "Year/month/day." Additionally, you have a powerful editor which allows you to create your own nested structures, or even to upload your own choices with simple text markup rules.



Create/edit your structure
You can create or edit your structure of nested lists right on this page in a pop up window. Use the Enter key to create new answer choices. Use the Tab key to move one level deeper in the structure. Use the Backspace key to move one level higher in the structure. Nested answers/lists will be moved along with the parent item you are moving. You can clone a branch and apply it to all items on the same level by clicking the leaf icon. Click Apply to save. Ctrl/Cmd + Z/Y/S keyboard shortcuts are supported. We encourage you to watch the tutorial video.


Upload your structure
You can upload your tree structure of nested lists in plain text (*.txt) format, preferably in Unicode with each answer on its own line. Use underscore _ before the lines that you want to use as a default text (e.g.: _Please select). Add (...) at the end of a line to allow an optional open-ended answer. Use spaces or tabs to create the tree structure. If you created your structure using bullet points or numbered lists, please make sure you use unique bullet symbols for every level and then save to .txt, or copy and paste into a text editor such as Notepad before uploading. Check out our Tabs example & Bullet list example.


You can also copy/paste your structure into the editor instead of uploading your file. The maximum supported number of records is 10,000.


The order in which lists and answer choices appear in each list for each respondent cannot be randomized, even if global randomization is ON in the survey.


This question can have an image associated with it, which can be expanded to the full width of the survey widget, or even appear as a thumbnail and pop up on mouse rollover as a reference.


Each answer choice can have an optional open-ended box attached. This will allow respondents to provide text answers if the selected answer is "Other, please specify…."


Each field has a limited number of characters: 120 for questions, 40 for answers. AYTM Prime members can use up to 240 characters for the question field.


Cascade questions can have a single skip logic destination, use the rabbit icon to set it up.



IN THE SURVEY EDITOR



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET



ON THE STATS PAGE

See an example of results on a stats page
This question type doesn't work with the AYTM Personality Radar

Forms

Form is an advanced question type that allows you to display a form in your survey, including several input fields one after another and controlling what respondents are supposed to enter into each. This question type requires at least one field and can have up to 7, extendable to 10 with the pro survey authoring package. In some special cases we allow more than 10 fields, but it's not recommended. Once a field is filled out, a respondent has a chance to change their mind, move among the fields and make edits. In order to advance to the next question, the respondent must satisfy validations for all the fields you set up in this question, otherwise we’ll highlight the fields with issues and ask the respondent to correct them.



There are three placeholder symbols that we use in the validation rules. The pound or hash symbol stands for a digit, star stands for a letter, and underscore stands for any character. Every placeholder will be shown to the respondent in a light grey font until it’s replaced with the actual entry. Some special fields, like emails and dates, are described with special codes. There are many modifications that you can use from our library.


Please note that it’s against our Terms of Use to ask respondents from our panel any personally identifiable information, such as their name, email, phone number, and so on. Therefore, you’ll see fewer pre-written options in the fields library on a Panel Survey.


Each field has a limited number of characters: 120 for questions, and 90 for the field labels. You can extend it up to 240 characters for questions, and 120 characters for labels, by purchasing the pro survey authoring package per individual survey OR upgrading to an AYTM paid membership.


A field question type can have the same optional skip logic destination. Use the rabbit icons next to the question to program this logic.


The entire question and each field can be illustrated with photos which you can upload from your desktop.




IN THE SURVEY EDITOR



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET



ON THE STATS PAGE



ON OPEN-ENDED ANSWER PAGE

See an example of results on a stats page
This question type doesn't work with the AYTM Personality Radar

 Quadrant Analysis

Quadrant Analysis is a popular way to explore a number of entities, such as brands, rated on a list of attributes and visualize them on classical quadrant view. For example, to get an idea of the fast food industry in the US, you may want to rate McDonald's, Wendy's, Burger King, and others in their competitive set on attributes like food quality, price, healthiness, speed of service, etc. This question type will calculate all median scores and will allow you to visualize up to 4 variables at a time (as values on the x and y axis, size and color). If you are interested in an equally easy but much more sophisticated methodology to gain understanding of consumers' perceptions of each brand, perceived similarities between them, learn each brand's most differentiating attributes, and a built in interactive 3D visual comparison of ratings among the brands, consider using our Competitive Topography turn key research test instead.



To plot a few variables on a quadrant analysis chart, researchers typically have to design a series of questions, program them, download the raw data once fielding is completed and set up a custom chart in Excel or analytical tool to plot the quadrants. At times these projects needed to be re-run if some of the parameters changed during the experiment. One of the best advantages of AYTM Quadrant Analysis is that it's incredibly easy to set up. It can be added just like any of our other question types - simply by dragging and dropping the corresponding icon from the sidebar, or by adding it at the bottom of the survey. An existing question can also be converted into a quadrant analysis question. All you have to do now is to fill out the list of entities you want to test and the list of attributes. If you're not sure which items to add, or you have a very long list, it may be wise to first run a MaxDiff survey to narrow down a longer list of attributes to just 5 to 7 of the most important ones. Alternatively, you can ask an unaided open-ended question, and code the answers, arriving at the list of the most frequently-referenced brands and attributes. If you already know what you want to test, you can proceed without this extra step.


The model works best with at least 4 entities and 4 attributes, and you can add up to 10 items in each list. In the right bottom corner of the attributes list you will find a combobox with a preset library of common attributes broken down to three groups - product attributes, service attributes, and general brand attributes.


As with most other question types, you have the ability to illustrate every field and randomize the order in which they will be presented. If you don't want certain options to be randomized, you can easily anchor them in place so they appear in the same order for each respondent.


You'll have to choose whether you want respondents to rate each entity with stars (which is the default mode on our platform) or sliders. If you choose to use a star rating, you'll be able to use 5, 7 or 9 stars for each attribute.



IN THE SURVEY EDITOR (Star rating)


Choosing sliders will give you more flexibility. You'll be able to choose from our library of pre-written Likert scales, edit the answers, write your own custom answers, and even adjust the scores from 1 to 99, which are provided automatically for you when an answer is chosen. By default we assume 10 points for one star OR the lowest answer on your Likert Scale, and we go all the way up to 50, 70, or 90 for a top rating. If you decide to edit the Likert scale OR adjust the scoring, please make sure you know exactly what you're doing, since it may drastically affect your model and data visualization.



IN THE SURVEY EDITOR (Sliders)


The last important decision here is to choose how to group these two lists. By default, we'll group them by entities - or brands, in our example. That means that each brand will be presented as a separate question, with attributes listed as sub-questions below. This grouping may be easier on respondents since it helps them to activate memories of all their experiences with a given brand or entity, enabling respondents to rate each brand or entity by all attributes you're testing.



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET (Grouped by entity)


If you switch to 'group by attribute', each question will ask about one attribute at a time, such as "Food healthiness", and will contain all compared brands on the page. It might introduce a higher cognitive toll on respondents, since they'll have to access a lot more memories across brands in order to answer each of the questions. Even so, in some cases this might be more valuable, since it'll help focus attention on comparing all brands across a given attribute. Please note that this test will take as many questions as there are items in the list you're presenting.



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET (Grouped by attribute)


It's important to make sure the question is still appropriate for your case. We have four pre-written question texts, designed for star ratings and sliders in both modes - grouped by entities and by attributes. Our platform will suggest default text as you adjust the parameters of the experiment, as long as the field is empty or untouched. If you edited the field already, we won't mess with your text, but you'll have to understand how it works and carefully test it out. You may notice the internal piping here. If you group by entities, the word [entity] will be replaced by a brand as you roll over it, helping you preview how each of the questions will read in the survey. The same thing will happen with your attributes. If you accidentally remove the magic word in square brackets, don't panic. You can type it back in or click on the warning that will appear underneath. You can click on the question icon to read a quick blurb about how it works. Clicking on the text of the warning will insert the code at the end of your question. Make sure you move it to the appropriate part of your sentence. We recommend watching the tutorial video for this question type to see it in action.


You can combine the Quadrant Analysis test with any other questions in your survey. As with any other survey, please test your entire questionnaire carefully in Preview mode, and launch it as you would any other study on our platform.


As data starts streaming in, we'll start building the quadrant view right away to help you explore and present the findings.



ON THE STATS PAGE


"Filter by compared entities" combobox allows you to declutter the visualization, which is useful when too many elements are competing for your attention. Hiding an entity will not alter the underlying math, it'll simply remove the element from the screen so that you can export exactly what you need to illustrate and communicate the finding in your presentation.


The other four comboboxes allow you to assign any of the attributes to each of the axes and the entities will be positioned accordingly on the grid. You can also use size and color to visualize two more attributes. For example, "Convenience/location" is set as the x-axis in the illustration above and "Food healthiness" as the y-axis, "food quality/taste" as size and "Food menu options/variety" as color. It helps quickly identify the leaders by all four attributes.


It wouldn't be fun if we hadn't added an extra twist to this view mode, on top of what you'd normally expect from a quadrant analysis. When you click on a circle, you can see the actual distribution of answer combinations by the current x & y attributes. Why does it matter? Since the position of the brands is a mean of all collected ratings, sometimes it's unclear what distribution of answers resulted in such a mean. For example, respondents could have been very polarized in their ratings, or they all consistently gave an average rating. In both cases the mean score and location of the brand would be very similar, and you wouldn't know the underlying truth. To discover the exact number of people who gave a certain combination of ratings, hover over the grey dots on the grid. The circle in the left bottom corner, for example, represents one star for "Convenience" and one star for "food healthiness," and 36 people gave that combination of ratings. The largest grey circle seems to be in the center of the top row, and this is because it was the most popular combination - 178 people gave the chain 7 stars for "convenience" and 4 for "healthiness."



ON THE STATS PAGE (Looking deeper at McDonald's)


Another useful thing about quadrant view is that you can see mean ratings for up to 4 selected attributes at a time in the grid below. Click on the headers to sort in ascending or descending order.


You can export any view as an image, or as a vector graphic which can be scaled to any size without compromising the quality. Please note that when you export the survey into PowerPoint, only the current view will be included. If you'd like to show more than one view, you'll need to manually export each image and paste it into your presentation.


Probably the most amazing thing about Quadrant Analysis and other research tests that you can run on the AYTM platform, besides being great interactive visualizations and easy to use, is that they're fully integrated into the stats page. This means that you can apply any combination of filters by demographics and/or traits, and have the numbers re-crunched in almost real time for you. You can see, for example, how perception of these fast food restaurants varied between genders or among age groups. You could even select a subset of respondents, such as those who are most loyal to Chick-fil-A, and view their overall perspective on our competitive set of quick service restaurants.


We encourage you to watch the tutorial video above. Feel free to ping us with questions or to set up a personal demo.


Polarity Scale

The Polarity Scale question type, also known as a semantic differential, is essentially a smooth scale with 200 steps, prompting respondents to move the slider to the left or right of center, in order to indicate how close their perception is to one of the two opposing alternatives located at each end of the scale. This question type is often used to measure subjective and nuanced perceptions of a brand, logo or corporate identity, product or service, character, experience, or a situation. It comes with a large library of pairs we’ve created for you. Feel free to choose them from the menu or enter your own unique scales.



At the bottom of the question you’ll find a series of checkboxes, allowing you to fine tune the experience for respondents. “Snap to center” creates a ‘gravitational zone’ ten steps in either direction from the center that will snap the slider back to the middle if a respondent is indecisive and leaves the slider too close to the center (or neutral answer). “Snap to poles” creates a similar gravitational zone around the extreme ends of the scales on the far left and far right. Once the slider is released within ten steps of either end, the platform will automatically snap it all the way to the end of the scale. When you use “Snap to center” with the “Accept Neutral” option off, you can prevent users from remaining undecided and force them to pledge their allegiance toward one end of the scale or another.


You can bundle as many as seven scales in one question, expandable to ten with the Pro Survey Authoring Package.

The main question and each scale can have a unique image associated with them. Please use a collage of two images in one file and stretch it to the full width of the survey widget if you want to illustrate each side of a scale and make the illustrations appear close to the corresponding ends of the range.

The order in which items appear for each respondent can be randomized if global randomization is ON in the survey. Each specific item can be anchored to its position to make an exception from the global randomization rule.


The Polarity Scale question type can also have a single skip logic destination, please use the rabbit icon to set it up.


By default you will see results presented in “Popularity” mode. It’ll show you how popular each side of the scale was, or how many people ended up leaving their slider on one side or another. If neutral answers were allowed, you may see some grey gaps in the center of the chart, indicating the percentage of undecided respondents.


The slider on top of the question allows you to change the rules of what you count as a neutral or undecided answer. It’ll work regardless of whether you allowed neutral answers or not in the survey.


Intensity mode incorporates the intensity of answers, or the degree to which respondents moved away from the center toward one side of the scale or another. The default view is called Pairs and shows intensities of answers on both sides of each scale. Delta mode calculates the average of all answers and shows the resulting value on the chart. You can further adjust the chart by choosing the mean or median option.


You can filter your survey by the Polarity Scale question type with ease. Just restrict the range for each pair to the values you want to allow in your filter and click apply. Please note: in the survey widget, the scale goes from 100 on one side to 100 on the other side, with 200 steps total. In the filters on the stats page, the scale is expressed from -100 to 100. It helps to process data and avoid ambiguities. Please also note that the stops on the sliders in filters will only show the values that were selected by at least one respondent who took the survey.




IN THE SURVEY EDITOR



IN THE SURVEY WIDGET



ON THE STATS PAGE